System Architecture

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The research group aims to determine energy efficiencies, aging and compatibility of promising materials in an early stage to optimize future cell designs.

The research group “System Architecture” represents a link between the material research groups and future application of novel materials in commercial batteries. In addition to active materials based on an intercalation mechanism, that display state of the art in commercial cells, conversion and alloying materials are in the spotlight of today’s research. Those different reaction mechanisms can be accompanied by e.g. increased volume changes or heat and therefore require novel approaches in terms of electrode preparation techniques. At the same time, newly developed materials can generate more variability in the cell architecture. Solid polymer electrolytes for example enable the preparation of flexible all-solid-state electrodes and can be processed on multiple ways.

Currently, the research group is working on two topics as well as in multiple cooperative activities inside the HIU.

Prof. Dr. Jens TübkePrincipal Investigator (PI)Tel: +49 (0721) 4640 343Mail: jens.tuebke(at)kit.edu
Research groupSystem Architecture
Dr. Silin XingScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34704Mail: silin.xing(at)kit.edu
Research groupSystem Architecture

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Thermal characterization of electrode materials

Heat generation and the accompanied variation in internal temperature become crucial parameters particularly for large-sized commercial cells. Being dependent on the load and the external temperature, they are important to describe thermal runaway behavior as well as performance and ageing of the cell.

Under the utilization of a heat flow calorimeter (TAM IV, TA Instruments) the research group is able to detect the small temperature changes on an electrode level. From the recorded heat flow rate one can conclude on the thermal behavior of large cells as well as faradaic and non-faradaic reactions taking place during operation.

 

Process development for all-solid-state batteries

In comparison to usual liquid electrolytes, employment of solid electrolytes promises safer, lighter and more eco-friendly all-solid-state batteries. In particular, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) offer enhanced thermal and mechanical stability, flexibility and easier processing. However, ionic conductivity and interfacial contact need to be improved in order to realize all-solid state batteries on a commercial scale. Against that background, the research group is working on a simple, scalable and solvent-free procedure that allows for the synthesis of SPEs inside the cathode material (in-situ). In this approach, the resulting SPEs are based on interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) allowing for the independent optimization of ionic conductivity and mechanical stability.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz
Asenbauer Jakob, Hoefling Alexander, Indris Sylvio, Tübke Jens, Passerini Stefano, Bresser Dominic
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Zeitschriftenaufsatz
Qin B., Diemant T., Zhang H., Hoefling A., Behm R. J., Tübke J., Varzi A., Passerini S.
Learn more
Members
Prof. Dr. Jens TübkePrincipal Investigator (PI)Tel: +49 (0721) 4640 343Mail: jens.tuebke(at)kit.edu
Research groupSystem Architecture
Dr. Silin XingScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34704Mail: silin.xing(at)kit.edu
Research groupSystem Architecture
Research

(images will be uploaded shortly)

Thermal characterization of electrode materials

Heat generation and the accompanied variation in internal temperature become crucial parameters particularly for large-sized commercial cells. Being dependent on the load and the external temperature, they are important to describe thermal runaway behavior as well as performance and ageing of the cell.

Under the utilization of a heat flow calorimeter (TAM IV, TA Instruments) the research group is able to detect the small temperature changes on an electrode level. From the recorded heat flow rate one can conclude on the thermal behavior of large cells as well as faradaic and non-faradaic reactions taking place during operation.

 

Process development for all-solid-state batteries

In comparison to usual liquid electrolytes, employment of solid electrolytes promises safer, lighter and more eco-friendly all-solid-state batteries. In particular, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) offer enhanced thermal and mechanical stability, flexibility and easier processing. However, ionic conductivity and interfacial contact need to be improved in order to realize all-solid state batteries on a commercial scale. Against that background, the research group is working on a simple, scalable and solvent-free procedure that allows for the synthesis of SPEs inside the cathode material (in-situ). In this approach, the resulting SPEs are based on interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) allowing for the independent optimization of ionic conductivity and mechanical stability.

Equipment

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Collaboration

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Publications
Zeitschriftenaufsatz
Asenbauer Jakob, Hoefling Alexander, Indris Sylvio, Tübke Jens, Passerini Stefano, Bresser Dominic
Learn more
Zeitschriftenaufsatz
Qin B., Diemant T., Zhang H., Hoefling A., Behm R. J., Tübke J., Varzi A., Passerini S.
Learn more

Group Facts