Electrochemical Energy Storage Materials

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The research group "Electrochemical Energy Storage Materials" focuses on the development and research of alternative electrode materials and electrolyte systems for lithium-based batteries and related energy storage technologies. The aim is to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms and processes that enable and determine the reversible storage of charge carriers and their efficient transport.

The development of new, sustainable and improved active and inactive materials for lithium-based and Li-free battery systems is essential for a successful energy transition. The diversification of the usable energy storage technologies and their optimization for selected applications is seen as a decisive factor. Examples of the work of the group are the research of alternative active materials for the negative electrode based on a combination of alloy and conversion reactions, the targeted introduction of redox-active elements in insertion materials, as well as polymer-based electrolyte systems and organic battery technologies. The goal of better understanding the processes and reactions taking place also always serves the parallel goal of improving and advancing the performance of the materials and electrochemical energy storage as a whole. To this end, the group can fall back on extensive know-how in the synthesis and characterization of energy storage materials and systems and also cooperates with a large number of groups with complementary competencies in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

 

Dr. Jakob AsenbauerScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34115Mail: jakob.asenbauer(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Hagyeong Baek PhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34111Mail: hagyeong.baek(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Adele BirrozziPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34115Mail: adele.birrozzi(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dr. Dominic BresserPrincipal Investigator (PI)Tel: +49 (0731) 50 34117Mail: dominic.bresser(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Xu DongPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34123Mail: xu.dong(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dr. Tobias EisenmannScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34112Mail: tobias.eisenmann(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Medina JasarevicPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34113Mail: medina.jasarevic(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dr. Matthias KünzelScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34114Mail: matthias.kuenzel(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Qi LiPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34027Mail: qi.li(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Haipeng LiangPhD StudentTel: Mail: hai-peng.liang(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Alexander MayerPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34106Mail: alexander.mayer(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Mayokun Uzezi OlutogunPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34114Mail: mayokun.olutogun(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Nikhil SchmelzlePhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34108Mail: nikhil.schmelzle(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Kai ShiPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34110Mail: kai.shi(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dominik SteinlePhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34105Mail: dominik.steinle(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dominik StepienPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34120Mail: dominik.stepien(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Po-Hua SuPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34121Mail: po-hua.su(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Yun XuPhD StudentTel: Mail: yun.xu(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Xilai XuePhD StudentTel: Tel: +49 (0731) 50 34121Mail: xilai.xue(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dr. Chen Zhen ScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34104Mail: chen.zhen(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries

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Insertion and Intercalation Materials

The vast majority of commercial lithium batteries is based on the use of insertion-type or intercalation-type electrode materials. Such materials can reversibly host the charge carrier cations without substantial changes (or the degradation) of the crystal structure. Increasing the reversibility of this process and enhancing the stability of the interface with the electrolyte, especially at very low and very high voltages, is of essential importance to further improve the performance of such materials. In addition to the development of a better understanding and the modification and optimization these compounds (including the realization of fine-tuned electrolyte compositions), we are working on a new insertion-type mechanism, for which we are introducing highly redox-active elements into such structurally stable frameworks in order to boost the achievable capacity by reversibly hosting substantially more charge carrier cations.

 

Conversion, Alloying and Conversion/Alloying Materials

Targeting higher specific capacities and (potentially) higher energy and power densities, we are also studying alternative charge carrier storage mechanisms, including conversion-type and alloying-type materials as well as materials that combine these two mechanisms in one single compound – so-called conversion/alloying materials. While (understoichiometric) silicon (oxide), for instance, has already reached the commercial stage – despite the extensive volume variation upon cycling, conversion materials are still at the research & development level. Of particular importance in this field is the identification of the origin of the extensive voltage hysteresis between the charge and discharge process, which is intrinsically limiting the eventual energy efficiency of the corresponding full-cells. One approach to overcome the related challenges is the transition to conversion/alloying materials with the goal to synergistically combine the two mechanisms and their rather complementary benefits, including the development of completely new materials based on an enhanced comprehension of the reaction mechanism and the impact of the different elements comprised.

 

Lithium-Metal Electrodes and “Anode-free” Concepts

Lithium-metal electrodes and so-called “anode-free” concepts, which are eventually also resulting in lithium-metal electrodes upon charge when the lithium from the positive electrode is plated at the negative electrode, are the “holy grail” of lithium battery research, as they promise the highest energy density possible in combination with suitable cathode active materials. Our group is studying the impact factors that are determining the homogeneity and reversibility of the lithium deposition, with the objective to realize highly efficient lithium plating and stripping by stabilizing the interface between the electrode and the liquid or solid electrolyte.

 

Organic Active Materials

The replacement of inorganic active materials by more sustainable organic materials has attracted a continuously increasing attention in recent years due to the great progress that has been achieved in this field. In addition to the development of new organic active materials and completely metal-free organic (solid-state) battery cells, a major focus of our work is dedicated to the development of an in-depth understanding of the electrochemical charge storage and charge transport processes occurring in such materials – at the molecular, particle, electrode and cell level – in combination with the design of advanced electrode architectures.d cost efficiency. This work is accompanied by the investigation of advanced hierarchical secondary particle architectures and the implementation of nanostructured, electronically conductive matrices to ensure long-term cycling stability and high rate capability. Eventually, the overall target is the realization of demonstrator full-cells, comprising “next generation” electrolyte systems and cathode active materials.

 

Electrode Composites and Inactive Materials

Most state-of-the-art (rechargeable) battery electrodes are composed of the active material and additional (inactive) components such as a conductive carbon additive and a polymer binder as well as a (metallic) current collector. In fact, essential improvement of the energy and power density of commercial battery cells has been achieved by improving the electrode composition and the electrode manufacturing process. We are specifically investigating the potential use of environmentally friendly processes and the potential use of bio-derived inactive components, especially for lithium-ion cathode materials, for which this is particularly challenging.

 

Polymer and Hybrid Electrolytes

Solid-state electrolytes such as polymers are considered key for the use of metallic anodes such as lithium, potentially hindering dendritic metal deposition. Additionally, they may enable an enhanced safety as well as good processability and adhesion to the metal electrode surface. Polyether-based electrolytes are, as a matter of fact, commercial already, but the operation of such lithium-metal-polymer batteries is limited to elevated temperatures around the melting point of the polymer. Moreover, the rather low stability towards oxidation commonly does not allow for the use of high-energy cathode materials operating at potentials beyond 4 V. Besides a further understanding of the charge transport mechanism in these electrolyte systems and the processes taking place at the interface with the metallic anode, our work is particularly focused on single-ion conducting polymer-based electrolytes, which enable the use at ambient temperatures and the combination with state-of-the-art lithium-ion cathode materials (e.g. NMC811), including the realization and in-depth understanding of alternative or modified charge transport mechanisms.

 

As science ideally does not know any barriers, we are collaborating with several international research groups, each of them having great expertise in their field, and we will be more than grateful to further extend these collaborative activities in future.

(information will be uploaded shortly)

(images will be uploaded shortly)

HighSafe II (2020-2023)

HighSafe II is a collaborative research project, including several academic partners from Taiwan and Germany, funded by the MOST and the BMBF, respectively. The overall goal is the development of safer and more sustainable high-energy lithium batteries. The role of the HIU is specifically dedicated to alternative anode concepts and safer electrolytes for such batteries.

 

Partners

– Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Baden-Württemberg (ZSW)
– Technische Universität München (TUM)
– National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), Taiwan
– National University of Tainan (NUTN), Taiwan
– National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTUST), Taiwan
– National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan

 

SACCESS (2020-2023)

SACCESS is a collaborative research project on organic batteries, funded by the DFG within the SPP 2248. The main goal is to investigate and develop polymer-type active materials based on squaric acid amides and cyclopropenium cations. The role of our group is the realization of suitable electrode architectures and cell designs for an advanced electrochemical performance.

 

Partners

– Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
– TU Dortmund University


Further information

https://gepris.dfg.de/gepris/projekt/441254245

 

ExcellBattUlm (2019-2022)

The ExcellBattUlm project is part of the BMBF-funded competence cluster ExcellBattMat. The major target is the investigation and development of high-performance and sustainable battery materials for future generation lithium and lithium-ion batteries. The work at the HIU is particularly focusing on the development of alternative anode materials, optimized electrolyte systems, and environmentally friendly electrode processing strategies.

 

Partners

– Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Baden-Württemberg (ZSW)
– Ulm University
– German Aerospace Center (DLR)

 

MOLIBE (2019-2023)

Within the collaborative MOLIBE project, funded by the ANR and the BMBF, partners from France and Germany, including industry and academia, are targeting the development of solid, metal-free rechargeable batteries based on organic active materials, polymer electrolytes and carbonaceous current collectors. Our group is serving as coordinator for this project.

 

Partners

– Daikin Chemical Europe GmbH
– CEA Grenoble, France
– CNRS-LEPMI Grenoble, France
– Bernard Dumas, France
– CANOE R&D, France

 

LISI (2019-2022)

The LISI project is a collaborative research project of American and German academic partners, funded by the DOE and the BMBF, with the objective to identify reliable and experimentally accessible descriptors determining the charge transfer through polymer-based electrolytes towards a lithium-metal electrode and the subsequent deposition. The work at the HIU is focusing the in-depth understanding of the processes occurring for polyether-type reference electrolytes and single-ion conductors, including the impact of the charge transfer mechanism.

 

Partners

– Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)
– Justus-Liebig University Gießen (JLU)
– Technical University Munich (TUM)
– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), USA
– Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA
– Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA
– Stanford University, USA
– Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
– Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA

 

LILLINT (2019-2022)

The LILLINT project is a collaborative research project of American and German academic partners, funded by the DOE and the BMBF, with the objective to better understand and increase the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the interface between lithium-metal electrodes and liquid electrolytes. The work at the HIU is mainly oriented towards the investigation of the interface with liquid electrolytes based on ionic liquids in comparison to common liquid organic electrolytes.

 

Partners

– German Aerospace Center (DLR)
– Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)
– TU Braunschweig
– WWU Münster
– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), USA
– Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), USA
– Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
– Texas A&M University, USA
– Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA

 

FestBatt (2018-2021)

The interdisciplinary FestBatt competence cluster, funded by the BMBF, targets the production, scale-up, and processing of suitable solid electrolytes for future batteries. The work at the HIU is focused on the development and investigation of polymer-based electrolytes with advanced ionic conductivity and electrochemical stability, enabling the realization of high-energy and high-performance lithium-metal batteries.

 

Partners (within the Polymer Platform)

– Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)

 

Further information

https://festbatt.net/

 

OFELIA (2018-2019)

Within OFELIA, funded by the DBU, our group and our partner are targeting the development of a conductivity cell for solid-state electrolytes with an online thickness determination.

 

Further information

https://www.dbu.de/OPAC/ab/DBU-Abschlussbericht-AZ-34562_01-Hauptbericht.pdf

 

Partner

– rhd instruments GmbH & Co. KG

 

NEW E2 (2017-2020)

The NEW E2 project, funded by the Vector Foundation, is dedicated to the development of alternative anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, based on new charge storage mechanisms such as the combination of conversion and alloying.

Mitglieder
Dr. Jakob AsenbauerScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34115Mail: jakob.asenbauer(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Hagyeong Baek PhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34111Mail: hagyeong.baek(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Adele BirrozziPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34115Mail: adele.birrozzi(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dr. Dominic BresserPrincipal Investigator (PI)Tel: +49 (0731) 50 34117Mail: dominic.bresser(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Xu DongPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34123Mail: xu.dong(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dr. Tobias EisenmannScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34112Mail: tobias.eisenmann(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Medina JasarevicPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34113Mail: medina.jasarevic(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dr. Matthias KünzelScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34114Mail: matthias.kuenzel(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Qi LiPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34027Mail: qi.li(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Haipeng LiangPhD StudentTel: Mail: hai-peng.liang(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Alexander MayerPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34106Mail: alexander.mayer(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Mayokun Uzezi OlutogunPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34114Mail: mayokun.olutogun(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Nikhil SchmelzlePhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34108Mail: nikhil.schmelzle(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Kai ShiPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34110Mail: kai.shi(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dominik SteinlePhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34105Mail: dominik.steinle(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Dominik StepienPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34120Mail: dominik.stepien(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Po-Hua SuPhD StudentTel: +49 (0731) 50 34121Mail: po-hua.su(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Yun XuPhD StudentTel: Mail: yun.xu(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Xilai XuePhD StudentTel: Tel: +49 (0731) 50 34121Mail: xilai.xue(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage Materials
Dr. Chen Zhen ScientistTel: +49 (0731) 50 34104Mail: chen.zhen(at)kit.edu
ForschungsgruppeElectrochemical Energy Storage MaterialsElectrochemistry for Batteries
Forschung

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Insertion and Intercalation Materials

The vast majority of commercial lithium batteries is based on the use of insertion-type or intercalation-type electrode materials. Such materials can reversibly host the charge carrier cations without substantial changes (or the degradation) of the crystal structure. Increasing the reversibility of this process and enhancing the stability of the interface with the electrolyte, especially at very low and very high voltages, is of essential importance to further improve the performance of such materials. In addition to the development of a better understanding and the modification and optimization these compounds (including the realization of fine-tuned electrolyte compositions), we are working on a new insertion-type mechanism, for which we are introducing highly redox-active elements into such structurally stable frameworks in order to boost the achievable capacity by reversibly hosting substantially more charge carrier cations.

 

Conversion, Alloying and Conversion/Alloying Materials

Targeting higher specific capacities and (potentially) higher energy and power densities, we are also studying alternative charge carrier storage mechanisms, including conversion-type and alloying-type materials as well as materials that combine these two mechanisms in one single compound – so-called conversion/alloying materials. While (understoichiometric) silicon (oxide), for instance, has already reached the commercial stage – despite the extensive volume variation upon cycling, conversion materials are still at the research & development level. Of particular importance in this field is the identification of the origin of the extensive voltage hysteresis between the charge and discharge process, which is intrinsically limiting the eventual energy efficiency of the corresponding full-cells. One approach to overcome the related challenges is the transition to conversion/alloying materials with the goal to synergistically combine the two mechanisms and their rather complementary benefits, including the development of completely new materials based on an enhanced comprehension of the reaction mechanism and the impact of the different elements comprised.

 

Lithium-Metal Electrodes and “Anode-free” Concepts

Lithium-metal electrodes and so-called “anode-free” concepts, which are eventually also resulting in lithium-metal electrodes upon charge when the lithium from the positive electrode is plated at the negative electrode, are the “holy grail” of lithium battery research, as they promise the highest energy density possible in combination with suitable cathode active materials. Our group is studying the impact factors that are determining the homogeneity and reversibility of the lithium deposition, with the objective to realize highly efficient lithium plating and stripping by stabilizing the interface between the electrode and the liquid or solid electrolyte.

 

Organic Active Materials

The replacement of inorganic active materials by more sustainable organic materials has attracted a continuously increasing attention in recent years due to the great progress that has been achieved in this field. In addition to the development of new organic active materials and completely metal-free organic (solid-state) battery cells, a major focus of our work is dedicated to the development of an in-depth understanding of the electrochemical charge storage and charge transport processes occurring in such materials – at the molecular, particle, electrode and cell level – in combination with the design of advanced electrode architectures.d cost efficiency. This work is accompanied by the investigation of advanced hierarchical secondary particle architectures and the implementation of nanostructured, electronically conductive matrices to ensure long-term cycling stability and high rate capability. Eventually, the overall target is the realization of demonstrator full-cells, comprising “next generation” electrolyte systems and cathode active materials.

 

Electrode Composites and Inactive Materials

Most state-of-the-art (rechargeable) battery electrodes are composed of the active material and additional (inactive) components such as a conductive carbon additive and a polymer binder as well as a (metallic) current collector. In fact, essential improvement of the energy and power density of commercial battery cells has been achieved by improving the electrode composition and the electrode manufacturing process. We are specifically investigating the potential use of environmentally friendly processes and the potential use of bio-derived inactive components, especially for lithium-ion cathode materials, for which this is particularly challenging.

 

Polymer and Hybrid Electrolytes

Solid-state electrolytes such as polymers are considered key for the use of metallic anodes such as lithium, potentially hindering dendritic metal deposition. Additionally, they may enable an enhanced safety as well as good processability and adhesion to the metal electrode surface. Polyether-based electrolytes are, as a matter of fact, commercial already, but the operation of such lithium-metal-polymer batteries is limited to elevated temperatures around the melting point of the polymer. Moreover, the rather low stability towards oxidation commonly does not allow for the use of high-energy cathode materials operating at potentials beyond 4 V. Besides a further understanding of the charge transport mechanism in these electrolyte systems and the processes taking place at the interface with the metallic anode, our work is particularly focused on single-ion conducting polymer-based electrolytes, which enable the use at ambient temperatures and the combination with state-of-the-art lithium-ion cathode materials (e.g. NMC811), including the realization and in-depth understanding of alternative or modified charge transport mechanisms.

 

As science ideally does not know any barriers, we are collaborating with several international research groups, each of them having great expertise in their field, and we will be more than grateful to further extend these collaborative activities in future.

Equipment

(information will be uploaded shortly)

Zusammenarbeit

(images will be uploaded shortly)

HighSafe II (2020-2023)

HighSafe II is a collaborative research project, including several academic partners from Taiwan and Germany, funded by the MOST and the BMBF, respectively. The overall goal is the development of safer and more sustainable high-energy lithium batteries. The role of the HIU is specifically dedicated to alternative anode concepts and safer electrolytes for such batteries.

 

Partners

– Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Baden-Württemberg (ZSW)
– Technische Universität München (TUM)
– National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), Taiwan
– National University of Tainan (NUTN), Taiwan
– National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTUST), Taiwan
– National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan

 

SACCESS (2020-2023)

SACCESS is a collaborative research project on organic batteries, funded by the DFG within the SPP 2248. The main goal is to investigate and develop polymer-type active materials based on squaric acid amides and cyclopropenium cations. The role of our group is the realization of suitable electrode architectures and cell designs for an advanced electrochemical performance.

 

Partners

– Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
– TU Dortmund University


Further information

https://gepris.dfg.de/gepris/projekt/441254245

 

ExcellBattUlm (2019-2022)

The ExcellBattUlm project is part of the BMBF-funded competence cluster ExcellBattMat. The major target is the investigation and development of high-performance and sustainable battery materials for future generation lithium and lithium-ion batteries. The work at the HIU is particularly focusing on the development of alternative anode materials, optimized electrolyte systems, and environmentally friendly electrode processing strategies.

 

Partners

– Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung, Baden-Württemberg (ZSW)
– Ulm University
– German Aerospace Center (DLR)

 

MOLIBE (2019-2023)

Within the collaborative MOLIBE project, funded by the ANR and the BMBF, partners from France and Germany, including industry and academia, are targeting the development of solid, metal-free rechargeable batteries based on organic active materials, polymer electrolytes and carbonaceous current collectors. Our group is serving as coordinator for this project.

 

Partners

– Daikin Chemical Europe GmbH
– CEA Grenoble, France
– CNRS-LEPMI Grenoble, France
– Bernard Dumas, France
– CANOE R&D, France

 

LISI (2019-2022)

The LISI project is a collaborative research project of American and German academic partners, funded by the DOE and the BMBF, with the objective to identify reliable and experimentally accessible descriptors determining the charge transfer through polymer-based electrolytes towards a lithium-metal electrode and the subsequent deposition. The work at the HIU is focusing the in-depth understanding of the processes occurring for polyether-type reference electrolytes and single-ion conductors, including the impact of the charge transfer mechanism.

 

Partners

– Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)
– Justus-Liebig University Gießen (JLU)
– Technical University Munich (TUM)
– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), USA
– Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA
– Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA
– Stanford University, USA
– Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
– Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA

 

LILLINT (2019-2022)

The LILLINT project is a collaborative research project of American and German academic partners, funded by the DOE and the BMBF, with the objective to better understand and increase the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the interface between lithium-metal electrodes and liquid electrolytes. The work at the HIU is mainly oriented towards the investigation of the interface with liquid electrolytes based on ionic liquids in comparison to common liquid organic electrolytes.

 

Partners

– German Aerospace Center (DLR)
– Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)
– TU Braunschweig
– WWU Münster
– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), USA
– Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), USA
– Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
– Texas A&M University, USA
– Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA

 

FestBatt (2018-2021)

The interdisciplinary FestBatt competence cluster, funded by the BMBF, targets the production, scale-up, and processing of suitable solid electrolytes for future batteries. The work at the HIU is focused on the development and investigation of polymer-based electrolytes with advanced ionic conductivity and electrochemical stability, enabling the realization of high-energy and high-performance lithium-metal batteries.

 

Partners (within the Polymer Platform)

– Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
– Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS)

 

Further information

https://festbatt.net/

 

OFELIA (2018-2019)

Within OFELIA, funded by the DBU, our group and our partner are targeting the development of a conductivity cell for solid-state electrolytes with an online thickness determination.

 

Further information

https://www.dbu.de/OPAC/ab/DBU-Abschlussbericht-AZ-34562_01-Hauptbericht.pdf

 

Partner

– rhd instruments GmbH & Co. KG

 

NEW E2 (2017-2020)

The NEW E2 project, funded by the Vector Foundation, is dedicated to the development of alternative anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, based on new charge storage mechanisms such as the combination of conversion and alloying.

Publikationen

Group Facts